Saturday, January 21, 2006

The Hindu

    Among the Indian owned English newspapers, The Hindu of Madras is probably the best, so far as get-up and news service are concerned. It always reminds me of an old maiden lady, very prim and proper, who is shocked if a naughty word is used in her presence. It is eminently the paper of the bourgeois, comfortably settled in life. Not for it is the shady side of existence, the rough and tumble and conflict of life. Several other newspapers of moderate views have also this 'old maiden lady' standard. They achieve it, but without the distinction of The Hindu and, as a result, they become astonishingly dull in every respect.
Who said this?

10 Comments:

At 11:45 AM, Anonymous Aadisht Khanna said...

RK Narayan?

 
At 6:45 PM, Blogger sahodaran said...

the best PM we've ever had,i think!

 
At 6:54 PM, Anonymous krishna said...

Pt. Jawaharlal Nehru, before independence. I think his description still holds largely true.

 
At 9:18 PM, Anonymous Pradeep said...

Its none other than Nehru as some one said.

Those who are interested in the hypocrisies of Present Hindu Editors must read article by Ramachandra Guha published 5 years ago in Telegraph, Calcutta

http://www.hvk.org/articles/0900/52.html

Guha says

" The curious thing about Nikhil Chakravartty and N. Ram is that at home they have been vigorous defenders of political and intellectual freedom. In 1975, five years before he visited Soviet-ruled Afghanistan, Chakravartty closed down Mainstream rather than subject it to the censorship imposed during the Emergency by Indira Gandhi. And Ram’s Frontline has sometimes championed unfashionable causes. For instance, it refused to join the super-patriotic acclaim for the nuclear blasts in the summer of 1998. What then explains these double standards? Why would these champions of freedom at home so energetically support brutal dictatorships (read China) abroad?"

Hindu's/Frontline's blind CPI(M) and China supports clearly underscores Guhas points in the essay.

 
At 9:48 AM, Blogger Anand said...

Thank you all! Yes, the answer is Nehru. I read this in his autobiography.

Pradeep -- Thanks also for the Ram Guha link. The Vikram Seth article that Guha mentions, is that available online?

 
At 9:47 PM, Anonymous Pradeep said...

Anand, I dont think Vikram Seths Tibet writings are avialable online. However you can find most of it in his book " From Heaven Lake" which was written while he was a Masters student at Nanjing University in China.

http://www.orionbooks.co.uk/MP-10326/From-Heaven-Lake.htm


Another interesting book about Tibet I recommend is " Tibet Tibet" by young British historian Patrick French

http://www.randomhouse.ca/catalog/author.pperl?authorid=52606

 
At 11:46 PM, Anonymous Anand said...

Many thanks, Pradeep.

 
At 7:30 AM, Blogger pennathur said...

http://telegraphindia.com/1060126/asp/foreign/story_5768059.asp

In case you don't get to read it in The Hindu

 
At 2:22 PM, Blogger pennathur said...

http://www.hindu.com/2006/01/27/stories/2006012705771200.htm

http://www.outlookindia.com/pti_news.asp?id=351095

Compare the reports. Wonder why The Hindu leaves out bits and pieces. Must be the "peoples' voice" at work I suppose.

 
At 11:28 AM, Blogger pennathur said...

Nehru must be the world's first limousine liberal (followed by the scotch and soda socialist KR Narayanan). Imagine his conceit. An aristocrat who wouldn't be caught eating in public (in Sri Lanka) talks with nose up in the air about the bourgeoisie readers of The Hindu! I thought Nehru's economics were cockeyed and now even his sensibilities seem so closeminded.

 

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