Tuesday, November 08, 2005

Paris riots

Olivier Roy writes in The New York Times:

    The rioting in Paris and other French cities has led to a lot of interpretations and comments, most of them irrelevant. Many see the violence as religiously motivated, the inevitable result of unchecked immigration from Muslim countries; for others the rioters are simply acting out of vengeance at being denied their cultural heritage or a fair share in French society. But the reality is that there is nothing particularly Muslim, or even French, about the violence. Rather, we are witnessing the temporary rising up of one small part of a Western underclass culture that reaches from Paris to London to Los Angeles and beyond.

    ... ...

    ... we are dealing here with problems found by any culture in which inequities and cultural differences come in conflict with high ideals. Americans, for their part, should take little pleasure in France's agony - the struggle to integrate an angry underclass is one shared across the Western world.

8 Comments:

At 12:26 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

glad to read, finaly, an opened minded comment about what's happening in my hometown . G (http://www;pasnet.blogs.com

 
At 1:53 AM, Anonymous Stalker said...

Civil War in France : http://stalker.hautetfort.com/archive/2005/11/09/bellum-civile-2-ou-cicil-war-in-france-par-francis-moury.html

Congratulations.

 
At 5:39 AM, Blogger gawker said...

You nailed it! It's pathetic how the attitude of just everyone in the world is to take pleasure in another country's misfortune just to prove a point. It happened in India during Katrina and is happening now in the US, where many right wingers are gloating about the supposed "muslim rebellion" occurring in a country that didnt want to send it's troops to a supposed "war on terror". As you said, it is more of an issue of unemployment, poverty and discrimination than religion.

 
At 5:55 AM, Blogger www.gypsynan.blogspot.com said...

Its only human to take gloat over the misfortunes of others. Jon Stewart said it best - protests in South America, violence in Iraq, Paris riots, yes! at least this one event they will not be able to pin down on us...

 
At 10:43 AM, Blogger Saroja said...

I wrote just a few days back to a friend in Paris expressing concern over the situation there and hoping he was safe. I was surprised by his nonchalant and dismissive reply “Oh! Just the mischief of some angry youth. These things keep happening…”- more so because he is generally touchy about being jeered at by racists.
I attributed his response to an occasional indifference to such issues on his part, but now I realise the aptness of his words and what they indicate about the general reaction of most people to such events as long as they are personally unaffected. These things have really become mundane affairs, haven’t they? And it is even more alarming to note that this insensitivity is now turning to morbid pleasure as gawker and gypsynan observe.
That article was candid.

 
At 7:57 PM, Anonymous Pablo Ares said...

Anand,

there are a couple of articles in Counterpunch on this topic you might be interested on. I do not know how to send a trackback to this post, so I posted them in my blog.

Pablo.

 
At 4:39 AM, Blogger Anand said...

Thank you all for the comments. Pablo's links are here.

 
At 8:22 PM, Blogger P&J said...

Severel Insighful Articles on this topic

(1) The Last Tango in Paris
by Prof. sanjay Subramaniam (finest historian of our times)

The only possible solution, albeit unpalatable to most here, is a proper reform of the political system. Participation in elections has been declining rapidly. There is widespread disgust with the cynicism and corruption of the political class, including a president who has long been under a cloud for his own dealings.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/msid-1289974,curpg-1.cms


(2) Explosion in the suburbs

by Naima Bouteldja ( French journalist and researcher)

The riots now sweeping France are the product of years of racism, poverty and police brutality

http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,,1635795,00.html

(3) The reality of l'affaire du foulard

by Naima Bouteldja

The French hijab ban, now in place for almost a year, has both veiled the country's social problems and unveiled its racism


http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,,1424850,00.html

 

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